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My Picture Taken Today:) 10 Pounds Gone!!!

My Picture Taken Today:) 10 Pounds Gone!!!

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How to Get More Essential Vitamin D this Fall/Winter.

While  we would love to hop a plane to a sunshine-kissed, warm-sand, tropical Island beach …  most of us need to make the best of the winter in which we live and work, and hopefully play. Here are a few suggestions to help avoid the winter blues.

1. Get light and sun every day.  Expose yourself to daylight early in the morning to keep your body’s internal clock on track. It could be as simple as dragging yourself out from under those cozy covers to open the shades, or sitting by a window with your tea or coffee.

2. Spend time outdoors. Even though wintery grey skies, especially in the Northwest, can seem sun-less, you are still receiving some filtered sun and light to help you feel better and elevate your mood. Fresh air is a fantastic elixir. Even if an effort of heroic proportions to take that first step out the door when it’s raining, you’ll always feel better afterwards – and you’ll feel so cozy returning home. Hats, gloves, scarves keep you extra warm and are fun to wear.
Light Boxes can also help give you mood-lifting rays with faux sun. Be sure to get one that filters out UV rays.

3. Head for the hills! In the Northwest we are gifted with mountains and beaches within a few hours drive. The mountain ranges unto themselves are exquisite to drive through, and once there, you will be amazed at how time in the snow or on the beach will elevate your mood and make you sparkle with energy.

4. Work it out. Exercise is always key in improving mood and maintaining a healthy body, but in winter it’s especially important to get up and move 3-5 times a week.
It may not be your cup of tea to run in the rain or cold but there are tons of other activities: Yoga, Zumba, Pilates, Barre, aerobics, dance classes, walking a high school track or out on our beloved Wildwood trails.

5. Put down the bread. When the temperature drops, our bodies tend to crave carbohydrates to give us that warm and full feeling. Temper your cravings and experiment with foods and tastes and recipes that you haven’t tried before. Use spices to heat up the cuisine. And of coarse, there is always dark chocolate:-)

6. Take your vitamins. Sunlight does a lot of work to keep our bodies balanced and working right. Plus, your body is no doubt missing all those fresh fruits and veggies you ate all summer. Taking a quality multi-vitamin can help supplement the nutrients you may be missing.

Perhaps the most important  supplement in winter is Vitamin D—this all-star vitamin helps keep your bones strong and keeps your morale sunshiny.

7. Set the scene. Warming up your spaces can help you enjoy the cold weather from the comfort of your home. Color it up with bright tropical hues, pull out the extra rugs, pillows, blankets – and when is the last time you cozied up to a hot water bottle?

8. Get social. If you’re feeling the winter blues, your friends are likely going through the same thing. Being engaged in conversation with good friends or in an activity or cause that you like is a fantastic distraction and energizer, and you’ll feel better knowing you aren’t alone in the winter gray days.

By freetobemetoo Posted in Health

90 Day Weight Loss Challenge:

Why Should I???

So, last Saturday morning I went LIVE on 88.1 FM Radio!!!  Why you ask? Well, for starters I recently had surgery and stopped breathing quite a few times on the operating table which has brought me to be hooked up to a stupid oxygen machine ( named Gus, after the killed off Drug Cartel guy in the AMC series, “Breaking Bad”- don’t ask). I was suppose to be on this thing 2 years ago when I was diagnose with sleep apnea but thought I didn’t need it. Well…guess what? If there was ever a scare to lose this weight, this is the biggie!

I don’t know how much any of you know about sleep apnea but extra weight plays a huge factor with this. After watching my show “Breaking Bad” on a Sunday night and with everyone asleep and having the tv to myself my mind started wandering to the fridge. This is my down fall. Somehow I make the association with down time and sweet alone time with some good o’l comfort food. Ahhhh..my chillin time! So, what do I do? Put TV on pause and motor through the fridge. A few days later when I had to be weighed at my doctor’s office my jaw dropped! Surely I couldn’t weigh this much! Something was wrong with their weigh scale..surely!

Fast forward I am now on a 90 day challenge where I plan on losing 30 pounds for my health and well being. I am so tired of feeling tired and even though I worked out 3 x week before my surgery, I still couldn’t get rid of my back fat, bra bulge, big thighs and tummy…aaahhhhgggggg.!!!

So now I am putting myself out there. I am invited back to do another radio interview in 3 months and update the station with my progress until then. I will try and keep on top of this with blogging on here as well so stay tuned as I will post another picture in 30 days from now as well as blog about how the program is going for me.  To see my picture that was taken at the radio station under their Pink Floyd poster go to https://www.facebook.com/FERIdiamondgirl    Wish me Luck Guys!!!!

Tequila Critical Care

Sleep Apnea

10 Blissful Beaches

1.Flamenco Beach

 Culebra, Puerto Rico

2.  Grace Bay

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

3.  Horseshoe Bay Beach

Southampton, Bermuda

4. Gold Rock Beach

Grand Bahama Island, Bahamas

5. Ruby Beach

Olympic National Park, WA

6. Balandra Beach

 La Paz, Mexico

7.  Hapuna Beach

Kohala Coast, HI

8. Eagle Beach

  Palm/Eagle Beach, Aruba

9. Crane Beach

 Ipswich, MA

10. Orient Bay Beach

 Orient Bay, St. Maarten/St. Martin

Hormone Therapy and Stroke – 10 year Study Report

ABSTRACT Principal findings on stroke from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI)clinical trials of hormone therapy indicate that estrogen, alone or with a progesterone, increases a woman’s risk of stroke. These results were not unexpected, and research during the past decade has tended to support these findings. Consistent evidence from clinical trials and observational research indicates that standard-dose hormone therapy increases stroke risk for post menopausal women by about one-third; increased risk may be limited to ischemic stroke. Risk is not modified by age of hormone initiation or use, or by temporal proximity to menopause, and risk is similar for estrogen plus progesterone and for unopposed estrogen. Limited evidence implies that lower doses of transdermal estradiol (≤50 μg/day) may not alter stroke risk. For women less than 60 years of age, the absolute risk of stroke from standard-dose hormone therapy is rare, about two additional strokes per 10 000 person-years of use; the absolute risk is considerably greater for older women. Other hormonal active compounds – including raloxifene, tamoxifen, and tibolone – can also affect stroke risk.

source:

Gompel A, Santen RJ; Climacteric 15 (3), 241-9 (Jun 2012)

  • Climatric Journal of Medicine

In a study trail over two thousand and five hundred women aged 45 to 84 researchers found that women who had early menopause before the age 46 were more than twice at risk of heart attack and stroke. It is due to lessening in natural supply of oestrogen at earlier stage than it would normally happen at the menopause.

According to researchers’ oestrogen protects women against heart disease. The average age for menopause is fifty-one years. It is expected that around one in five women undergo hysterectomybefore the age of fifty-two that can cause an early menopause though their ovaries are retained.

It is vital for women to know that early menopause is a possible riskfactor for cardiovascular diseases. They can work harder to improve their adjustable risk factors such as blood pressure and high cholesterol by exercising and following healthy diet, said Dr Melissa Wellons from the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

The study presented at The Endocrine Society’s meeting in San Diego found that no women had heart attack or stroke before the age of fifty-five. After that, women who had early menopause had twice likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease than those who had not.