BEWARE: Mood Swings and Protein Shakes!

How Soy Protein Isolate Affects Your Behavior

Like some of you who are reading this, I too became obsessed with protein shakes. I would have them in the morning while getting ready for the day or I would take them in my car waiting for the weight to drop..so handy, right?  I would believe people when they told me that I was having diarrhea because my “body was cleansing itself”..what?? (I found out later it was the fake sugar). My mood swings were up and down like a yo yo and I observed others taking the same product getting irritable and cranky. At the time I just jotted it all down to them having a bad day. Boy, was I wrong!

After watching Dr. Oz explain how we should avoid soy for our health, I began reading the product label on my protein shake and I noticed the first ingredient listed was “soy protein isolate”.    What was this and what was it doing to my body? This lead me to start my research, partly because I have hypothyroidism and knew I was feeling some negative physical effects.

Soy is Americas largest cash crop being touted as having a myriad of health benefits and it does not matter if it states “non GMO” as this is used as a buzz marketing word. The soy bean is stripped and processed and pulverized right down to expose the garbage waste product called soy protein isolate. Kind of like cardboard.

What’s so bad about soy?:

  • Contains Isoflavones (Genistein and Daidzein).  In soy the isoflavones are built in insecticides.  If they kill bugs are they good for humans?

  • Isoflavones are estrogen like substances which have the same effect as the bodies estrogen.  Cancer comes from having too much estrogen.  Irritability and mood swings, fat gain from the waist down, fibrocystic breast disease uterine fibromas are all associated with estrogen dominance.  Instead of helping prevent the bad effects of environmental or natural estrogen dominance soy isoflavones are now known to increase the bad effect of estradiol and estrone the two major bad guys of the estrogen family.  (1,2,3).

  • Kills testicular tissue.  In men it permanently reduces testicular function and lowers Luteinizing Hormone production. LH is what signals your testicles to work.  This increases the probability of estrogen dominance in men with its hair loss, swollen and cancerous prostates. (4,5).   Male children fed soy formulas and soy products may not ever get to like girls.  Doris Rapp MD, the worlds leading pediatric allergist, asserts that environmental and food estrogens are responsible for the increase in male homosexuality and the worldwide reduction in male fertility. (6)

  • Isoflavones decrease thyroid hormone production. This can stunt children’s growth and make the rest of us tired and fat. (7,8,9).

  • Female children fed the estrogens in soy formula and products hit puberty very very early sometimes as young as age 6 to 8!  (10).

  • Pregnant women eating soy products may affect the sexual differentiation of their children.  Studies show malformations of the reproductive tract or offspring born with both male and female sexual organs. (11).

  • Isoflavones decrease GOOD cholesterol (HDL). (12,13).

  • Soy contains Phytin, which takes essential minerals such as iron, zinc, magnesium etc. out of the body before they can be absorbed.  Also soy contains Trypsin inhibitors block this vital anti cancer enzyme, anti fibrosis enzyme. (14).

  • A 7000 man 30 year epidemiological study done in Hawaii shows soy is connected with a higher rate of Vascular Dementia (Alzheimer’s disease).  (15,16).

Any opinions to contradict the facts noted above have been paid for by the Agribusiness giants Monsanto and Archer Daniels Midland.  Once public knowledge of their manipulation of public opinion and of the FDA becomes widely known, expect monster class action lawsuits against these folks.  They’ll deserve it in spades!

References:

  1. Casanova, M., et al.; Developmental effects of dietary phytoestrogens in Sprague –Dawley rats and interactions of genistein and daidzein with rat estrogen receptors alpha and beta in vitro.  Toxicol Sci 1999, Oct.; 51 (2): 236-44.
  2. Santell, L., et al.: Dietary genistein exerts estrogenic effects upon the uterus, mammary gland and the hypothalamic / pituitary axis in rats.  J. Nutr 1997 Feb.;127 (2): 263-9.
  3. Harrison, R.M., et al.; Effect of genistein on steroid hormone production in the pregnant rhesus monkey.  Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1999 Oct.; 222(1): 78-84.
  4. Nagata, C., et al.; Inverse association of soy product intake with serum androgen and estrogen in Japanese men.  Nut Cancer 2000; 36(1): 14-8.
  5. Zhong, et al.; Effects of dietary supplement of soy protein isolate and low fat diet on prostate cancer.  FASEB J 2000; 14(4): a531.11.
  6. Rapp, Dorris J., Is This Your Child’s World.  Bantam Books 1996. Page 501.
  7. Divi, R. L., Chang, H.C. and Doerge, D.R.; Identification, characterization and mechanisms of anti-thyroid activity of isoflavones from soybeans.  Biochem Pharmacol 54:1087-1096, 1997.
  8. Fort, P., Moses, N., Fasano, M. Goldberg, T. and Lifshitz, F.; Breast and soy formula feedings in early infancy and the prevalence of autoimmune disease in children.  J Am Coll Nutr 9:164-165, 1990.
  9. Setchell, K. D. R., Zimmer-Nechemias, L., Cai, J. and Heubi, J.E.; Exposure of infants to phytoestrogens from soy based infant formula.  Lancet 350:23-27, 1997.
  10. Irvine, C.H.G., Fitzpatrick, M.G. and Alexander, S.L.; Phytoestrogens in soy based infant foods: Concentrations, daily intake and possible biological effects.  Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 217:247-253, 1998.
  11. Levy, J.R., Faber, F.A., Ayyash, L. and Hughes, C.L.; The effect of prenatal exposure to phytoestrogens genistein on sexual differentiation in rats.  Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 208:60-66, 1995.
  12. Ashton, E., Ball, M.; Effects of soy as tofu vs. meat on lipoprotein concentrations.  Eur J Clin Nutr 200 Jan; 54(1):14-9.
  13. Madani, S., et al.: Dietary protein level and origin (casein and highly purified soybean protein) affect hepatic storage, plasma lipid transport, and antioxidative defense status in the rat.  Nutrition 2000 May;16(5):368-375.
  14. Leiner, I.; The Intraperiotoneal toxicity of concentrations of the soybean trypsin inhibitor.  J Biol Chem 193:183 (1951).
  15.  White, L., Petrovitch, H., Ross, G.W. and Masaki, K.H.: Association of mid life consumption of tofu with late life cognitive impairment and dementia: The Honolulu-Asia Anti Aging Study, The Neurobiol of Aging 17 (suppl. 4):S121, 1996a.
  16. White, L, Petrovitch, H., Ross, G.W., Masaki, K.H., Abbot, R.D., Teng, E.L., Rodriguez, B.L., Blanchette, P.L., Havlik, R.J., Wergowske, G., Chiu, D., Foley, D.J., Murdaugh, C. and Curb, J.D.; Prevalence of dementia in older Japanese-American men in Hawaii. JAMA 276:955-960, 1996b.
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Modified Palm Oil :Good or Bad?

Keeping Ahead of the Food Industry’s Devious Ploys.

So, again I was stuck at the supermarket for 2 “friggin” hours reading labels. Does this sound like you? I noticed that I wasn’t seeing “hydrogenated” anymore…anywhere! Instead, I was seeing a lot of ” modified palm oil or modified palm kernel oil. What was this new word? Was it bad for my family? Just the word “modified” kind of scared me. Changing something into something else that is desired sound like tampering with nature. So, I started inquiring around the store. No one seemed to know what it meant. So, I thought I would investigate and put it out there to inform any one who was interested.

Palm oil is the second-most consumed oil in the world and it is quickly replacing the partially hydrogenated fats (or trans fats) in many of your favorite treats. But there’s a dark side to palm oil. Read on to discover what you need to know about this controversial oil.

Palm oil, derived from the fruit of the oil palm tree (Elaeis spp.), is abundant and inexpensive. It is also odourless, tasteless, and solid at room temperature, which makes it ideal for use in packaged foods, margarines, and shortening.Palm oil is trans fat- and cholesterol-free, making it an ideal replacement for those pesky partially hydrogenated oils.

Good Oil, Bad Fat

In its purest form, palm oil is a source of valuable nutrients, including beta carotene, vitamins E and K, magnesium, and essential fatty acids. However, this form is rarely used, says Patricia Chuey, registered dietitian and manager of nutrition affairs for the Overwaite a Food Group.

Instead, food manufacturers use modified palm oil, which is high in saturated fat and no more nutritious than the partially hydrogenated oils it is replacing, says the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). In fact, a recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition found a link between the consumption of palm oil and an increased risk of heart attack.

Current recommendations to reduce saturated fat intake have led to listing palm oil among the foods to avoid, says Dr. Jennie Weisenburger, a naturopathic doctor at the Bellevue Natural Health Clinic in West Vancouver. “There are different schools of thought when it comes to saturated fats and the health benefits and the health risks associated with consuming them,” she says. At issue is palmitic acid (the main saturated fat in palm oil); some studies have linked it to high cholesterol and heart disease and some have not, Weisenburger explains.

Palm Oil and the Environment

It’s not just the saturated fat in palm oil that is raising concerns. Palm oil is grown predominantly in Malaysia and Indonesia, where palm oil plantations contribute to the destruction of Southeast Asian rain forests, says a CSPI report released in 2005. Rather than using abandoned agricultural land, which is costly to rehabilitate, palm oil producers clear rain forests and peat swamp forests to create plantations. The soil and water from these lands are polluted by pesticides used on the plantations and the release of effluents into the environment. According to the CSPI report, they are also endangering the lives of the Sumatran tiger, orangutans, elephants, and rhinoceros.

The American Palm Oil Council (APOC) calls the CSPI’s report “highly inaccurate,” accuses them of “excessive exaggeration,” and suggests the study’s authors have never been to Malaysia to study the oil palm industry. Strict laws are in place in Malaysia to ensure the protection of the environment and its wildlife, says the APOC. They point to the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry’s involvement in the Round-table for Sustainable Palm Oil, an initiative focusing on the development and maintenance of responsible, sustainable palm oil plantations, as evidence of their commitment to the environment.

Finding Balance

Though some palm oil producers likely shirk their responsibilities, others take every step necessary to protect the environment and its wildlife. Palm oil and the issues that surround it serve as a good reminder of the importance of being mindful of the impact of our food sources on the earth.

There is no question that palm oil, in its purest form, contains valuable nutrients and can be part of a healthy diet. But, as always, be cautious of consuming too many processed foods. Look for organic expeller-pressed palm oil that is minimally processed. Avoid palm kernel oil, which is less healthy because the oil is extracted from the pit with a hydrocarbon solvent.

Healthy living means not only making choices that are wise for our species but also making choices that keep the Earth and the rest of its inhabitants safe.

Easy Ways to Limit the Palm Oil in Your Diet

  • Get your dietary fats from polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids (fatty fish, flaxseeds, nuts, nut butters, liquid egg products), and monounsaturated fat (avocados and vegetable oils such as canola, olive, and soybean oils).
  • Limit your consumption of processed foods.
  • Bake homemade cookies and treats instead of buying commercially prepared treats.
  • Daily calories from fat should represent only 20 to 35 percent of total calories (about 45 to 75 g per day for women and about 60 to 105 g per day for men), recommends the Canadian Heart and Stroke Association.

13 Shortcuts to Meet Your 5-a-Day Quota

 

Easy Ways to Eat More Fruits and Veggies

Eating for Health

Eating for Health

We all know we should be eating our fruits and vegetables. You’ve probably heard the recommendations for meeting a 5-a-day quota, or seen the USDA’s recommendation to fill half of your plate with fruits and veggiesduring each meal. And you probably already know that eating fruits and vegetables provides a number of important health benefits, like reducing the risk of chronic diseases and heart disease and helping you manage your weight. Eating a diet filled with veggies and fruits might also protect against certain cancers and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. With all of those benefits, you’d think the entire human population would be chowing down on bok choy and snacking on spinach. But not everyone has a built-in love for the produce department. If you struggle to fit in your fruits and vegetables, read on for some tips and tricks to make eating a healthier diet easier than ever!

Tips for Increasing Your Fruit and Vegetable Intake 1. Eat a fruit or vegetable with every meal. If half a plate of fruits and vegetables seems like an overwhelming goal for you right now, start by simply adding one fruit or veggie to each meal. You can eat them as a side—think a cup of green beans with dinner or a banana with breakfast—or simply start adding them to foods you already eat. Fruit is a cinch to add to oatmeal, yogurt and cereal in the morning. Add onions and peppers to meat dishes, or pile a few of your favorite vegetables onto your sandwich. Once you start working them in, you’ll welcome the new additions!

2. Snack smart. Instead of hitting the vending machine for an afternoon pick-me-up, start snacking on fruits and vegetables. Cut veggies and hummus or sliced fruit with yogurt dip will satisfy you more than a candy bar will.

3. Drink up. While you should limit the number of calories you get from beverages, if you have trouble fitting fruits and vegetables into your busy life, work them into a drink that you can take on the go. Try out smoothie recipes until you find a few you love and work them into your rotation as a breakfast or afternoon snack option. You can easily get several fruit and vegetable servings in a yummy beverage. If you simply want juice, look for 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice for it to count as a serving, but limit yourself to no more than one serving of fruit or vegetable juice per day, as the calories are concentrated and juice removes some of the other benefits of produce (such as fiber).

4. Slurp some soup! Soups and stews can be a nutritious, filling way to get lots of vegetables into a meal. Soup is an easy way to increase the variety of veggies you eat, too, as it can make some of your least favorite options more palatable. If you don’t make your own, make sure you know the healthy soup options at the grocery store.

5. Be ready at all times. Have cut fruits and vegetables in the fridge ready for munching at all times. Whether you buy the pre-cut options in the produce department or take the time to cut and bag it yourself, you’re more likely to eat it if it’s readily and easily available. Have hummus, low-fat ranch or fruit dip on hand, too, if it’ll encourage you to eat up.

6. Keep them in sight, in mind. Just like you keep sweets out of sight to discourage incessant snacking, keeping fruits and veggies in sight will help you think of them as an option for eating. Stock a fruit bowl at work each week and keep a bowl on the kitchen counter at home so you’ll be more likely to eat it when you’re hungry.

7. Bar hop. Next time you’re blanking on a quick, easy place to grab lunch, head to the salad bar at a local grocery store. With an endless variety of vegetables, cut fruit and soups, it’s an easy way to make sure you get a meal rich in nutrients and fiber.

8. Start smart. Make it a habit to order a salad or vegetable-based soup when you’re out at restaurants. These fiber-rich starters may keep you from overeating when your meal comes, in addition to helping you add more vegetables into your day.

9. Bag it up. It may be more expensive to buy pre-chopped lettuce mixes, but they make whipping up a salads a breeze. Throw a few into your shopping cart so you can take salads to work for lunch or have dinner salads ready throughout the week. Just make sure your salad toppings are healthy ones!

10. Use the freezer. If you buy produce in bulk only to have it rot in your refrigerator before you get to it, start using your freezer more frequently (and check here for produce storage tips!). Have a stock of frozen fruits and veggies on hand at all times so you’ll always have them ready for smoothies and easy dinner sides.

11. Chop them up. If you have a hard time crunching into big vegetables, try slicing and dicing them into a more manageable size. Shred carrots and zucchini or finely dice onions, pepper and spinach to hide in pasta sauces, hamburger patties, omelets and casseroles.

12. Pack portable produce. If you’re a snacker who gets hungry when you’re out running errands or on the way home from work in the early evening, carry easy-to-eat fruit and vegetable items for snacking. Spinach and kiwi may not be convenient on the go, but baby carrots, chopped broccoli and celery sticks are great for munching anywhere, as are no-muss, no-fuss bananas, apples and grapes. Dried fruits like raisins and prunes are easy to have on hand for a quick snack, too.

13. Find the ones you love. While you should aim for a variety of fruits and vegetables in your diet, don’t hesitate to stick to the handful you love if you can only stomach a few. It won’t do you any good to buy the spinach you know you hate if it’s just going to sit in your crisper until it turns into goo. Buy your favorite fruits and vegetables and eat up, while allowing yourself to experiment with new options every now and then. You never know–you might find a new favorite! The USDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention both have calculators on their sites to help you calculate how many fruit and vegetable servings you should aim for each day. Everyone’s caloric and dietary needs are different and depend on age and activity level, so see what’s recommended for you and make that your new goal!  Sources USDA’s MyPlate. ”Add More Vegetables to Your Day,” accessed November 2011. www.usda.gov.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ”Nutrition for Everyone,” accessed November 2011. www.cdc.gov.

Who is ViSalus Sciences Anyways? Do They Really Care?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ViSalus in Perspective:

 

Interested to know who actually owns ViSalus Sciences? Well, the company is called Blyth. This is a family owned corporation having 2 direct selling companies under its umbrella. They have existed since 1977. Incredible isn’t it?

ViSalus Sciences is a Health and Wellness focused direct sales company with corporate offices in Troy, Michigan and Los Angeles, California. Offering a diverse line of quality nutritional supplements, energy drinks, and weight management solutions, the ViSalus community of customers and distributors stretches from coast to coast and promotes better health through its line of health and wellness products.  ViSalus now has distributors here in Canada. This is Amazing, right?? If you would like to take a look at some of the products, feel free to drop by at this address: http://fitnesshalton.myvi.net/challenge

 

ViSalus also matches donations to the Food Bank of your choice to feed the hungry. They have a program called ‘Feed the Kids” where every $24.00 donated another $24.00 is matched, thereby providing 60 meal replacements. Amazing isn’t it?  This is done online at http://www.fitnesshalton.visalusgiving.com